Molecule

Jackson Group

Our research interests lie at the interface between biology, chemistry and physics where fundamental chemistry underlies biological function.

About

Our research interests lie at the interface between biology, chemistry and physics and are directed towards gaining an understanding of the fundamental chemistry that underlies biological function. For example, how is an enzyme is capable of accelerating chemical reactions? Or, how do mutations allow enzymes to evolve new functions?

Our group is also interested in applied science and using chemical techniques to manipulate biological systems, which can include the design of small molecules (drugs) that change the function of biological molecules or engineering proteins to make them function according to our needs.

Publications

Personal Webpage

Rangefinder

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Projects

Allosteric inhibitors, Neobiochemistry and Engineering an insulin biosensor.

Student intake

Open for Honours, PhD students

Theme

Analytical Chemistry and Sensors, Medicinal Chemistry and Drug Development, Physical and Biophysical Chemistry

Members

Leader

Researcher

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Lab Manager

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Casual Research Assistant

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Postdoctoral Fellow

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Postdoctoral Fellow

Postdoctoral Fellow

Student

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PhD Candidate

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PhD Candidate

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PhD Candidate

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PhD Candidate

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Research Assosicate

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PhD Candidate

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PhD Candidate

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Casual Research Assistant

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PhD Candidate

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PhD Candidate

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Honours Student

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PhD Candidate

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PhD Candidate

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PhD Candidate

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PhD Candidate

News

New research led by The Australian National University (ANU) could hold the key to unlocking the power of enzymes, allowing them to potentially be used to break down toxic pollutants or heal wounds faster.
Enzymes can help speed up – or catalyze - chemical reactions, making them an essential part of every living organism.
“They also have extraordinary potential in industry and medicine,” Associate Professor Colin Jackson from the ANU Research School of Chemistry said. 

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Joe

Congratulations to Joe Kaczmarksi (Jackson Group) on being awarded a 2019 ASBMB Fellowship.

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Adam Damry- 2020 awardee of the Human Frontiers in Science Postdoctoral Fellowship

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More information