About

Catalysis is the acceleration of a chemical reaction by a substance that itself does not undergo change. Catalysts can be chemical or biochemical, organic, inorganic or organometallic, soluble or insoluble, molecular or material-based. Catalysts are important because they allow chemical reactions that are otherwise very difficult to achieve. They also give us both new ways and better ways to make molecules. Catalyst design, catalyst function, and the deployment of catalysts in synthesis are all active areas of study at the RSC.

Groups

We develop homogeneous organometallic transition metal catalysts which utilise molecular cooperativity to improve catalytic efficiency and develop new processes

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At the Connal group we make polymers with applications across a multitude of industries which means we develop new materials for a range of applications.

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Magnetic Resonance Facility

Our group studies transition metal catalysts using both magneto-optical spectroscopy and magnetic resonance techniques.

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Hicks group

Research in the Hicks group focuses on the reactivity of earth abundant, non-toxic metals in regards to sustainable chemical synthesis.

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Liquid metal

Our work covers organometallic chemistry with a particular focus include unsaturated ligands involving metal–carbon multiple bonding.

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Nano material

Our work is mainly concentrated on the interaction amongst synthesis, micro-structure and polarisation-related properties of functional materials.

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Malins group

The Malins group develops synthetic tools for small molecule, peptide and protein synthesis, including for applications in chemical biology and drug discovery.

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Drug chemistry

The McLeod group employs a wide range of techniques to study drug metabolism.

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Organic molecule

The Norcott group research interest centres on using organic synthesis and reactivity to design new, functional molecules with important purposes.

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Organic molecule

Our research program involves the design of sequences of cycloaddition reactions, free radical reactions and transition metal-mediated reactions

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Our research focuses on supramolecular chemistry – the chemistry of non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, halogen bonding and coordination bonds. 

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Light

Our research mainly focuses on the interaction between light and chemicals and its application in materials sciences.

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Nano technology

The group is interested in synthesis & understanding of nano-to-atomic materials & structures.

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Projects

A Trojan horse to combat malaria, Anti-doping chemistry, Enzyme engineering and Exploring the ‘sulfatome’.

Student intake

Open for Honours, PhD students

Advanced Optical Spectroscopy, The mechanism of biological water splitting and Redox non-innocent first row transition metal complexes.

Student intake

Open for Honours, PhD students

Artificial biomaterials and the Development and 3D printing of functional materials

Student intake

Open for Honours, PhD students

Designing cooperative transition metal catalysts.

Student intake

Open for Honours, PhD students

Student intake

Open for Summer scholar students

People

Domino Reactions, Step Economic Total Synthesis and Synthesising Designed Molecules.

Student intake

Open for Honours, PhD students

Members

Academic staff

Senior Lecturer
Rita Cornforth Fellow
ARC DECRA Fellow

HDR Convenor
Associate Director

Honorary Professor

Associate Professor

Senior Lecturer

ARC Laureate Fellow

Associate Professor
Westpac Research Fellow

Associate Professor

Associate Director (Education)
Professor

Nick

Associate Professor
Australian Research Council Future Fellow

ARC Future Fellow

Articles

The research work of ARC Laureate Fellow Prof. Michelle Coote from the RSC has been featured in an article in New Scientist titled “Electric Chemistry” by Gege Li.

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Wonderful news – Professor Yun Liu has been awarded an ARC Laureate Fellowship.

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